Event 1: Live with the Land

EmailShare

“Forests and Deer: Requirements for Conservation”

This session took place online on November 16, 2010 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.


View Recording    Global Classroom  Teacher Community  Student Challenge

The work of forest conservation can sometimes seem paradoxical. On one hand, conservationists strive to preserve animal populations for the sake of forest diversity. On the other hand, some animal populations can endanger this diversity. In most of the developing world, deer species are endangered; but in developed countries, deer have reached populations levels that make their management necessary to reach other conservation goals. This session explores the question of how forests function under different “densities of deer.”

Bill McSheaDr. Bill McShea
Wildlife ecologist


Bill McShea is a wildlife ecologist for the Smithsonian’s Conservation Biology Institute at Front Royal, Virginia. He has edited two volumes on wildlife management and has published more than eighty articles in ecological journals. His current research focuses on the management of animal populations in forested ecosystems, including giant pandas in China, rare deer in Cambodia, large mammals along the Appalachian Trail, and migratory birds at high-elevation sites in Virginia. In addition, he offers courses to teachers on using forests to explain biodiversity concepts to students.

Bill McShea - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.




“Documenting the Reality of Our Landscapes”

This session took place online on November 16, 2010 and ran about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.


View Recording   Global Classroom  Teacher Community  Student Challenge

Toby Jurovics, curator for photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM), leads a discussion of the new exhibition of John Gossage’s photography series, The Pond, and of Gossage’s work as it reflects his interest in how we view and document the reality of our landscapes.

Smithsonian American Art MuseumToby Jurovics
Curator of Photography, Smithsonian American Art Museum

Toby Jurovics is curator for photography at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He is responsible for research, exhibitions and acquisitions related to the museum’s photography collection.

Toby Jurovics - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.




Smithsonian Tree Banding Project:

“The World’s Students Monitor the World’s Trees”

This session took place online on November 16, 2010 EST and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.


View Recording   Global Classroom  Teacher Community

Forest ecologist Dr. Geoffrey “Jess” Parker and education specialist Josh Falk, both of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, preview the Smithsonian Tree Banding Project. Starting with classrooms in the southern hemisphere in January, students around the globe will monitor the rate at which their local trees grow and learn how that rate corresponds with the climate. Parker and Falk will discuss the practical matters of the project: how a class goes about selecting trees to study, how to identify the tree species, and how the data will be collected. They will introduce the band dendrometer—the tool that students will use to measure tree growth—which will be fully demonstrated in the January session. Dr. Parker will also highlight his forest research and how it connects to the work students will do in this project.

Geoffrey "Jess" Parker

Geoffrey “Jess” Parker
Senior Scientist and Forest Ecologist
Geoffrey Parker has been the forest ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) since 1987. His research interests include the structure and function of forest ecosystems, the spatial relationships of forest trees, and comparative forest ecology.

Josh FalkJoshua Falk
Education Specialist
Joshua Falk has been an environmental educator for more than ten years. For the last four years he has been at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), where he enjoys “connecting learners of all ages to the research that our scientists do.”

Tree banding - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.

2 Responses to “Event 1: Live with the Land”

  1. fatou diouf May 15, 2011 at 7:37 pm #

    I am from Senegal and insted of a reply i would rather say that we almost have the same problem .ended we are facing the increasing of the desert and it freghten us a lot also we have the problem of big amount of salt in the land it is not good for agiculture it disminish and destroy our crops i als owould like to share your idieas about this.THANK YOU

  2. Cheryl Arnett December 8, 2010 at 2:31 pm #

    We are second graders at Sunset Elementary School in Craig, Colorado. We listened to Bill McShea’s program about the deer. We have a big deer problem in our town and everyone is upset about it. Your program helped us understand the causes of the problem and we are looking for some solutions. You can hear our blog about it at http://secondgradejoy.posterous.com/. We are getting suggestions from other places in the world, but we would like to her what Mr. McShea thinks we should do. Please put a comment on our blog or answer this email with your ideas. Thank you!
    Mrs. Arnett’s second grade