Event 3: Change and the Land

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“The Art of Science”

This session took place online on March 26, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

View Recording  Global Classroom  Teacher Community  Student Challenge

This additional resource is also available for download:

Classroom activities inspired by the exhibition Alexis Rockman: A Fable for Tomorrow are the focus of this session embracing science and art as complementary ways of understanding our world. Rockman is one of the first contemporary artists to build his career around exploring environmental issues, from evolutionary biology to deforestation and climate change. His work expresses deep concerns about the world’s fragile ecosystems. In this session, museum educators will model the writing prompts, optics demonstrations, and art activities included in the American Art Museum’s multidisciplinary Observation Journal.

Art of Science - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.


Suzannah NiepoldSuzannah Niepold is Teacher Program Coordinator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. She is responsible for teacher workshops, pre- and in-service training, Teaching American History grant programs, classroom resources, and the coordination of a partnership program with District of Columbia schools. Suzannah also launched the museum’s program that provides classroom videoconferencing and an online community of practice to visual arts teachers in the Department of Defense schools around the world. Before receiving a graduate degree in museum education from The George Washington University, she worked in a number of museums, including the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Sally OtisSally Otis is Videoconference Coordinator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. In this position, she brings together a background in studio art, art history, and museum education. In addition to training the museum’s videoconference presenters, Sally collaborates with Department of Defense teachers across the U.S., Europe and Asia, developing classroom resources that correlate to their curriculum standards. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she worked at an elementary school, a historic house, a space-science center, and a botanical garden. She has a B.A. in graphic design and a graduate degree in museum education from The George Washington University.


“Educating for Global Competence: Why does it matter today? What does it look like in student work?”

This session took place online on March 26, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

View Recording  Global Classroom  Teacher Community  Student Challenge

The challenge is clear: The world for which we are preparing students today is fundamentally different from the one many of us experienced growing up. Today’s societies are marked by new global economic, cultural, technological and environmental trends that are part of a rapid and uneven wave of globalization. In this session we will examine how to prepare our youth for an increasingly interdependent world. Specifically, we will explore what it means to be a globally competent person and what global competence looks like in students’ work. To do so we will draw on the new definition of global competence developed through a collaboration between the Asia Society Partnership for Global Learning and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

Global Competence - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.


Verónica Boix Mansilla Verónica Boix Mansilla is the Chair of the Future of Learning Institute at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, the director of the Interdisciplinary Studies Project at Harvard Project Zero, the founder of the Latin American Initiative for Understanding and Development (L@titud), and a Fellow at the Asia Society. She has taught at both the Harvard Graduate School of Education and at the University of Buenos Aires, and serves as an advisor to the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), International Baccalaureate, and the Association of American Colleges and Universities. Veronica’s research examines the conditions that enable experts and young learners to produce quality interdisciplinary work addressing problems of contemporary significance. Her most recent work focuses on the development and nurture of an informed global consciousness. She is the author of two books, Teaching for Interdisciplinary Understanding in the Middle Years Program and Educating for Global Competence (with Tony Jackson).


“Inspiring Students about Living, Breathing, Changing Soils”

This session took place online on March 26, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.


View Recording  Global Classroom  Teacher Community  Student Challenge

The primary goal of environmental education should not be to teach, but to inspire. Inspiration was the goal that guided the design of the Smithsonian exhibition Dig It! The Secrets of Soil. The exhibition stresses the importance of soil conservation by showing that soils are living, breathing, changing natural bodies that form the basis for all land ecosystems—forests, deserts, wetland, tundra—and that enter into our daily lives in amazing ways. An online version of the exhibition includes cartoons, a fun quiz, and a role-playing game. Exhibition curator Pat Megonigal shows how Dig It! and its related materials can breathe life into classroom ecological studies.

Soils - Virtual Graphic FacilitationVirtual Graphic Facilitation:
This session was illustrated in real time. Click for an illustrated summary of this Shout event. Refer to the drawing as a memento of the session and to inspire continued exploration of this topic.


John KressPat Megonigal is an Ecosystem Ecologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland. His studies focus on how ecosystems, especially wetlands, respond to climate change and nutrient pollution. He is curator of the award-winning exhibition Dig It! The Secrets of Soil.

 


UPDATE on the Smithsonian Tree Banding will immediately follow this Session Three. Hear from Jess Parker and Josh Falk about the schools across the world that are joining Smithsonian researchers in this citizen science project. It’s not too late to sign up!