Event 6: Celebrate the Land

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Forest Service, Culture, and Community

This session took place online on September 21, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

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DESCRIPTION: Every occupational group—whether biologists, cowboys, engineers, or firefighters (to take just a few of the first letters of the alphabet)—has distinct skills, knowledge, and codes of behavior that define it as a community. In this session, Smithsonian curator and oral historian James Deutsch discusses the occupational culture of the U.S. Forest Service. He will draw on his experience of working with the U.S. Forest Service for a Smithsonian Folklife Festival program in 2005 and also working for the Forest Service as a seasonal naturalist in Alaska.

James DeutschJames I. Deutsch is a Curator and Editor at the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, where he has helped to develop programs and exhibitions on such various subjects as the U.S. Forest Service, the Peace Corps, the Apollo Theater, the Mekong River, World War II, and the Silk Road. In addition, he teaches courses on film history as an adjunct professor at The George Washington University and has taught American Studies classes at universities in Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Germany, Kyrgyzstan, Norway, Poland, and Turkey.


Earth from Space

This session took place online on September 21, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

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DESCRIPTION: In previous Shout sessions we’ve taken an up-close look at the environment, sometimes even at a microscopic level. In this final conference, we take a big step back. Andrew Johnston, geographer at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum, discusses the trends we can see from satellite images—the rise and fall of water levels, the growth of urban centers, the disappearance of Arctic ice and tropical forests—and how scientists are working to better understand our planet from beyond the planet.

Andrew K. JohnstonAndrew K. Johnston is a geographer at the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, National Air and Space Museum. He researches remote-sensing technology for studying regional environmental trends such as land-cover change and natural processes such as forest dynamics. His field surveys have ranged from the Amazon River to the District of Columbia. He also serves as curator and content expert for the museum’s planetarium exhibitions and programs about astronomy and space exploration, including planetarium programming the traveling exhibition Earth from Space.


UPDATE on the Smithsonian Tree Banding

This session took place online on September 21, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

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DESCRIPTION: Over 200 schools in 25 countries and 40 states in the US are now using their Smithsonian tree banding kits! Josh Falk will review the accomplishments made during the first year of this global citizen science project and will discuss the newly launched online database for the project—how it works and the cool applications students can do with it.

Josh FalkJoshua Falk has been an environmental educator for more than ten years. For the last four years he has been at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC), where he enjoys “connecting learners of all ages to the research that our scientist do.”



You’re the Interviewer!

This session took place online on September 21, 2011 and ran for about one hour. If you could not participate live, a recording is posted below for your enjoyment at any time.

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DESCRIPTION: By popular demand, Smithsonian experts and curators return to Shout to update us on their latest findings, field your questions, focus on your insights, and address your concerns about environmental issues and successes. Joining in the discussions will be Cheryl Arnett, Gary Krupnick, Bill McShea, Ana Maria Tinsler, Jonathan R. Thompson, Sunshine Van Bael, and others.

Cheryl Arnett Cheryl Arnett has been teaching a first-second grade loop for the past 18 years at Sunset Elementary School in Craig, Colorado. She earned her BA from Regis University in Denver, CO and an MA from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, AZ. Cheryl was a participant in the 2010 and 2011 Microsoft Innovative Education Forums and also represented the United States at the 2010 World-Wide Forum in Cape Town, South Africa. Shout sessions have inspired many activities and projects in her second grade classroom

Alex GriswoldAlex Griswold is Executive Producer of the Science Media Group of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. He studied film and “visual anthropology” as an undergraduate at Harvard College and went on to freelance work for PBS, NBC, ABC, and feature-film productions and to produce television documentaries on migration and cultural assimilation. At the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, he has produced and directed numerous programs addressing challenges in science education. The recent The Habitable Planet was recognized with an AAAS Spore prize for online science education resources.

Dr. Gary A. KrupnickDr. Gary A. Krupnick has been the Head of the Plant Conservation Unit in the Department of Botany, National Museum of Natural History since 1999. He coordinates activities and research that focus on plant conservation, biodiversity hotspots, and endangered plant species. His research examines how data from herbarium specimens can be used in assessing the conservation status of plant species. Dr. Krupnick is the co-editor of the book Plant Conservation: A Natural History Approach (University of Chicago Press; 2005), and the editor of two newsletters—the Biological Conservation Newsletter and The Plant Press (newsletter of the U.S. National Herbarium).

Bill McSheaBill McShea is a wildlife ecologist for the Smithsonian’s Conservation Biology Institute at Front Royal, Virginia. He has edited two volumes on wildlife management and has published more than eighty articles in ecological journals. His current research focuses on the management of animal populations in forested ecosystems, including giant pandas in China, rare deer in Cambodia, large mammals along the Appalachian Trail, and migratory birds at high-elevation sites in Virginia. In addition, he offers courses to teachers on using forests to explain biodiversity concepts to students.

Ana Tinsler Ana Tinsler is the Program Specialist for the Global Tiger Initiative at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute. Prior to joining the Smithsonian, she worked at National Geographic’s Center for Sustainable Destinations and at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She holds a B.A. in geography and history from Michigan State University, where her work included field studies on sustainable development and tourism and the impact of land subdivision on indigenous communities around the world. An enthusiasm for travel, she says, stems from a multinational upbringing in Egypt, Costa Rica, Spain, and Peru.

Jonathan R. Thompson, Ph.D.Jonathan R. Thompson is a Forest Landscape Ecologist at the Smithsonian’s Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Virginia, and a Research Associate at Harvard Forest, a 3,000-acre long-term ecological research site in Massachusetts. Jonathan specializes in the use of spatial-simulation models and remote-sensing data and is interested in the ways that forest ecosystems respond to disturbances such as timber harvest, climate change, and land use over long periods of time. He has an M.S. in forest policy and a Ph.D. in forest ecology, both from Oregon State University.

Sunshine Van Bael Sunshine Van Bael is a “Community Ecologist” on the research staff at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. She studies plant-animal interactions and the importance of these relationships to tropical biodiversity. Her studies have included the conservation of tropical species and the improvement of agricultural systems to increase sustainability and biodiversity.



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