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Archives of American Art

The world’s largest and most widely-used resource on the history of art in America.

ArchivesThe Archives of American Art is the world’s largest and most widely-used resource on the history of art in America. Its Research Collections span more than 200 years and contain over 17 million items including documents, photographs and multi-media assets which trace the rich histories of the artists, galleries, critics and collectors who have shaped the visual arts in America. Complementing these holdings, the Archives commissions and makes available for research Oral History Interviews with leading figures in the arts. The public may view original documents by appointment at the Archives of American Art’s Research Centers in Washington, DC and New York, NY, and access microfilm records at Affiliated Research Centers nationwide or through Interlibrary Loan. A growing number of collections are available via the web through Collections Online where documents may be viewed in the exact order and arrangement found in original collections. In addition to reference services, the Archives of American Art organizes exhibitions and symposia, publishes the Archives of American Art Journal, and offers numerous Internship, Volunteer, and Fellowship Opportunities.

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MomentOf the Moment: A Video Sampler from the Archives of American Art The medium of video and the records of video artists increasingly inform the multifaceted research collections at the Archives of American Art. This exhibition offers an introduction to some of the fascinating artist-created video holdings preserved at the Archives.
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RyanMedia Utopia: Art and Advocacy of Paul Ryan This on-line exhibition highlights documents from the Paul Ryan papers and presents a compilation video of work from throughout Ryan’s career as an artist, including environmentally-oriented studies.
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JournalLandscape This downloadable issue of the Archives of American Art Journal explores how artists have responded to the subject of landscape, ranging from early sketches to conceptual art projects to the large-scale undertakings of the Earthworks movement.
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